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Principles of Yoga
Proper Relaxation
Proper Exercise
Proper Breathing
Proper Diet
Meditation

Proper Relaxation

Proper Relaxation Proper relaxation means forgetting about all your tensions. By releasing the tension in the muscles and putting the whole body at rest, you revitalize your nervous system and achieve inner peace, making you feel relaxed and refreshed. This relaxed feeling is carried over into all your activities and helps you conserve your energy and let go of all worries and fears.

Long before the invention of cars, planes, telephones, computers, freeways and other modern triggers of stress, the Rishis (sages or seers) and Yogis devised very powerful techniques of deep relaxation. As a matter of fact, many modern stress-management and relaxation methods borrow heavily from this tradition. By deeply relaxing all the muscles, the Yogi can thoroughly rejuvenate his nervous system and attain a deep sense of inner peace.

When the body and the mind are constantly overworked, their natural efficiency to perform work diminishes. Modern social life, food, work and even the so-called entertainment, such as disco parties, television etc., make it difficult for modern people to relax. Many have even forgotten that rest and relaxation are nature's way of recharging. Even while trying to rest, the average person uses a lot of physical and mental energy through tension because of which, much of the body's energy is wasted uselessly.

More of our energy is spent in keeping the muscles in continual readiness for work than in the actual useful work done. In order to regulate and balance the work of the body and mind, it is best to learn to economize the energy produced by our body. Learning to relax may do this.

It may be remembered that in the course of one day, our body usually produce all the substances and energy necessary for the next day. But it often happens that all these substances and energy may be consumed within a few minutes by bad moods, anger, injury or intense irritation. The process of eruption and repression of violent emotions often grow into a regular habit. The result is disastrous, not only for the body, but also for the mind.

During complete relaxation, there is practically no energy or "Prana" being consumed, although a little amount of energy is used to keep the body in normal condition, while the remaining portion is being stored and conserved.

In order to achieve perfect relaxation, yogis use three methods: "Physical", "Mental", and "Spiritual" relaxation. Relaxation is not complete until the person reaches that stage of spiritual relaxation, which only advanced spiritual aspirants know.

Physical RelaxationPhysical Relaxation
We know that every action is the result of thought. Thoughts are converted into actions. Just as the mind may send a message to the muscles ordering them to contract, the mind may also send another message to bring the relaxation to the tired muscles.

Physical relaxation first begins with the toes and then moves upward. The autosuggestion passes through the muscles and reaches the eyes and ears at the top. Then, slowly, messages are sent to the kidneys, liver and the other internal organs. This relaxation position is known as Savasana, or the "Corpse Pose".

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